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Cigar Review | Cuban Crown Private Reserve Robusto

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out the Cuban Crown Private Reserve in the Robusto size. This 5×50 box-pressed cigar is made by Master Blends Cigar Co. and features a Mexican San Andres wrapper concealing undisclosed fillers. It retails for eight dollars and some change.

Cuban Crown Private Reserve

The wrapper puts off a leathery oak aroma while I smell earth out of the foot. On the cold draw, I pick up no flavor. Once lit, there is light cocoa powder. Through the nose, more cocoa powder comes through with some toast and graham cracker. The finish gives me black pepper spice and earth.

Cuban Crown Private Reserve

Twenty-five minutes in, the first third closes out. On the draw, I pick up cocoa powder with leather. Through the nose, red pepper mixes with cedar. The finish offers me dried cherry, more cocoa, and some earth. Strength and body settle in at the medium-to-full mark.

Cuban Crown Private Reserve

The second third gets me to forty-five minutes. I find oaky bourbon-like flavors on the draw with more leather. On the retro-hale, the red pepper gets spicier with the addition of toast. Metallic earth comes through the finish on top of nutty cocoa. There is no change to strength and body.

Cuban Crown Private Reserve

The final third clocks out at an hour and fifteen minutes. I pick up the same flavors on the draw with a salty note. Through the nose, cinnamon and toast blend well together. Cherry returns to the finish with earth and light coffee notes. Both strength and body finish out at medium-to-full.

The Cuban Crown Private Reserve is an excellent cigar. It offers a great amount of complexity with flavors that blend well together. Construction is perfect, smoke output is phenomenal, and the price is just right. I highly recommend this cigar and look forward to smoking more.

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Cornelius & Anthony Meridian Robusto

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out the Cornelius & Anthony Meridian. For this review, I smoke the Robusto, a 5×52 stick with a very oily Ecuadorian wrapper. Inside is a Nicaraguan binder and fillers from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. It retails for $8.75.

Cornelius & Anthony Meridian

The wrapper produces a leathery manure aroma while I smell raisin out of the foot. The cold draw gives me damp earth flavor. Once lit, I find salty leather with cinnamon. Through the nose, rich leather mixes with sweet dough. The finish offers saltiness with black pepper and cinnamon.

Twenty minutes in, the first third closes out. On the draw, I pick up vegetal earth with leather and black pepper. Through the nose, I find sweet bread dough alongside cinnamon and what I would describe as potpourri. The finish offers cinnamon with leather and earth. Strength and body settle in at medium-to-full

Cornelius & Anthony Meridian

The second third ends after fifty minutes. More vegetal earth hits me on the draw with graham cracker and black pepper. There is no change to the retro-hale. On the finish, I get more cinnamon with damp oak and leather. Strength and body remain at medium-to-full.

Cornelius & Anthony Meridian

One hour and fifteen minutes in, the final third wraps up. I pick up more vegetal earth on the draw with leather and a distinct saltiness. Through the nose, nutty toast blends with black pepper. I find floral coffee notes on the finish mixed with smoky oak. Strength and body finish out at medium-to-full.

Cornelius & Anthony Meridian

The Cornelius & Anthony Meridian is an excellent cigar with great flavors. It’s a complex blend with a lot of depth. Construction is good even though I did have some hiccups with the burn in the second third. The price is reasonable, and it’s an overall enjoyable smoke that I highly recommend!

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Battleground Darby

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out the newest offering from Battleground Cigars. The Darby is a naturally infused cigar comprised of a Mexican San Andres Maduro wrapper, Honduran Criollo binder, and Honduran Corojo fillers. It is aged in Leadslingers Whiskey barrels for 60 days causing an infusion of whiskey flavor and aroma. It appears to be a standard 6×50 Toro, but I could not find confirmation of this.

Battleground Darby

There is no flavor on the cold draw. The wrapper produces a whiskey aroma, and I smell the same out of the foot. Once lit, I get light leather on the draw with a slight cocoa. Through the nose, cinnamon and toast mix. The finish gives me more leather, black pepper, and earth.

Twenty-five minutes in, the first third comes to a close. On the draw, I pick up light cocoa with a hint of whiskey flavor. Through the nose, I get a bit more whiskey flavor and spicy toast. The finish offers leather on top of graham cracker and black pepper. Strength and body settle in at the medium mark.

Battleground Darby

After fifty minutes, I finish the first third. I pick up sweet cocoa on the draw with almond and a hint of caramel. On the retro-hale, there is light whiskey with earth. The finish gives me oak alongside cocoa and black pepper. Strength and body remain the same at the medium mark.

Battleground Darby

One hour and twenty minutes in, the final third closes out. On the draw, I pick up black pepper and light cocoa. Through the nose, oak and toast blend with black licorice. Black pepper absolutely dominates the finish. Strength and body finish out consistently at the medium mark.

Battleground Darby

The Battleground Darby is the first infused cigar I’ve thoroughly enjoyed. It offers hints of whiskey flavor here and there, but there is enough true “cigar” flavor to balance things out. It has a good amount of complexity, and construction is great. Price is my only knock on this stick as it’s very pricey at $19.95. If you can pony up the coin, I recommend trying it out.

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Nomad Martial Law

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out the Nomad Martial Law. This new creation from Fred Rewey is the first Nomad stick to have a suggested retail price of over $10 (sitting at $12, actually.) It features a Habano wrapper, Jalapa binder, and Nicaraguan fillers. I cannot find confirmation online, but I do believe it is a Nicaraguan puro. Maybe, I should have asked Fred at IPCPR! Anyways, it comes in one size – a 6×50 Toro.

Nomad Martial Law

On the cold draw, I pick up a sour cocoa flavor. The wrapper produces a faint toast aroma, while I smell graham cracker out of the foot. Once lit, I get oily leather with hay, earth, and black pepper. Through the nose, I find sweet toast and cinnamon. On the finish, black pepper increases alongside red pepper and toast.

Thirty minutes in, the first third comes to a close. On the draw, I pick up oily earth alongside leather and oak. Through the nose, spicy red pepper fights against sweet graham cracker. The finish gives me prune with a smoky ginger and more oak. Strength and body settle in at medium-to-full.

Nomad Martial Law

The second third gets me to one hour and ten minutes. Toast and more oak come through on the draw with some black pepper. There is no change to the retro-hale. The finish hits me with spicy wheat and more black pepper. Strength and body are consistent at medium-to-full.

Nomad Martial Law

The final third ends at an hour and forty-five minutes. Dominating black pepper explodes on the draw with the return of leather. On the retro-hale, I continue to get spicy red pepper and sweet graham cracker. The finish hits me with smoky oak, black pepper, and a hint of floral citrus. Strength and body finish out at the medium-to-full mark.

Nomad Martial Law

The Nomad Martial Law is a fine cigar. It has great construction and some nice flavors. Complexity is decent, and it is a thoroughly enjoyable smoke. I must say, I still find the C-276 to be my favorite Nomad stick. It’s just an amazing blend, but that cigar offers an entirely different flavor profile. I definitely recommend checking this out. If you like anything else Fred makes, I’m sure you’ll enjoy this one.

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Fratello Boxer

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out the Fratello Boxer. This 6.25×52 box-pressed Torpedo features a gorgeous, reddish-brown Nicaraguan Habano wrapper. Underneath is an Ecuadorian Sumatra binder and fillers from Nicaragua and Peru. It appears to be expertly rolled.

Fratello Boxer

The wrapper produces a bold manure aroma. Out of the foot, I smell an herbal earth and leather aroma. On the cold draw, I pick up a slight bitter earth flavor. Once lit, there is rich chocolate and black pepper on the draw. Through the nose, there is more chocolate with earth and white pepper. On the finish, I find more spicy black pepper, leather, and a dark wood.

After twenty-five minutes, the first third comes to a close. This third is much like the start of the cigar. On the draw, I pick up rich chocolate with a bomb of black pepper. Through the nose, I find sweet earth with white pepper. The finish offers cinnamon with charred peanut and leather. Strength and body settle in at the medium-to-full mark.

Fratello Boxer

The second third gets me to fifty-five minutes. I pick up more chocolate on the draw alongside a metallic grass. On the retro-hale, I’m treated with a delicious mix of salted caramel and molasses. The finish is oily with earth, more leather, and black pepper. Strength and body remain at the medium-to-full mark.

Fratello Boxer

The final third closes out at one hour and fifteen minutes. Chocolate continues to dominate the draw alongside a sweet oak. Through the nose, the oak carries through but with a smoky characteristic and a compliment of more molasses. On the finish, spicy black pepper and earth blast my palate. Strength and body jump to the full mark in this final third.

Fratello Boxer

The Fratello Boxer is a phenomenal cigar with flavors that keep you begging for more. It’s a complex smoke with a profile that just melts together to create a smooth and balanced experience. It’s got enough strength and body to keep things interesting, but it’s not going to knock you out, either. For my first Fratello cigar, this sure did impress me, and I can’t wait to try more. I highly recommend this cigar!

I’d like to give a big shout out and thank you to my friend, Joan, for sending this to me for review. I greatly appreciate it!

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Sawtelle Inkwell

It’s Stog o’Clock once more, and this time, I check out the Sawtelle Inkwell. This 6.5×52 Torpedo features a very sharp box press and a simple, classy label with a hand-written cursive “S” on it. The blend is top secret, but I’ve been able to find out that it has a Maduro wrapper and tobaccos ranging from the Dominican Republic to Nicaragua.

Sawtelle Inkwell

On the cold draw, I pick up a light sawdust flavor. The wrapper gives off an antique wood and manure aroma. The foot produces a similar smell with a fruity element. Once lit, I find toast and black pepper spice on the draw. The retro-hale offers cedar, nutmeg and earth. On the finish, there is more cedar with black pepper and cinnamon.

Twenty-five minutes in, I finish the first third. On the draw, I pick up roasted almond paired with vanilla and toast. Through the nose, there is distinct gingerbread and molasses flavor. The finish offers charred cedar with black pepper and leather. Both strength and body settle in at the medium mark.

Sawtelle Inkwell

The second third closes out at forty-five minutes. The almond flavor on the draw now comes in with a spicy note on top of nutmeg and oak. On the retro-hale, I find a simple combo of leather and citrus. The finish is dominated with nutty earthy and smoky leather. Strength and body jump up slightly to the medium-to-full mark.

Sawtelle Inkwell

The final third ends at one hour and fifteen minutes. On the draw, I find more oak on top of leather with the return of vanilla. Through the nose, there is black pepper spice and more citrus complimented by grass. The finish transforms to a wonderful blend of smoky coffee, cocoa, and vegetal hay. Strength and body close out at the medium-to-full mark.

Sawtelle Inkwell

The Sawtelle Inkwell is a delicious cigar. It has a lot going on in the flavor department, and the blend just works. Construction is good, and the only complaint I had was a little tar buildup on the head. The kicker with this smoke is its price point. The Inkwell can be had for $5-7 depending on the quantity purchased. That seals the deal and makes this cigar a true winner in my book. I highly recommend it!

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | E.P. Carrillo Maduro No. 4

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out the E.P. Carrillo Maduro in the No. 4 size. This 5.1×42 Corona features a blotchy Connecticut Broadleaf Maduro wrapper that looks as if it could be dyed. This wrapper leaf is aged three years prior to rolling. Within is an Ecuadorian Sumatra binder and fillers from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic.

EP Carrillo Maduro

The wrapper puts off a minimal manure aroma. Out of the foot, there is a raisin aroma. The cold draw is snug with chocolate and raisin flavor. Once lit, I pick up dark chocolate, mild raisin, and earth on the tongue. Through the nose, I find smooth leather with cedar and chocolate. The finish is short with black pepper spice and more chocolate.

Twenty-five minutes in, the first third comes to a close. On the draw, there is dark chocolate alongside black bean and oak. Through the nose, I find a delicious blend of dark earth, vanilla, and heavy cream. The finish is long with espresso, black pepper, and black licorice. Both the strength and body settle in at the full mark.

EP Carrillo Maduro

The second third gets me to forty-five minutes. The draw offers a chocolate-covered raisin note on top of more oak. On the retro-hale, there is more tasty vanilla complimented by leather. The black pepper is toned down on the finish and mixes with espresso and butterscotch. There is no change to strength or body.

EP Carrillo Maduro

One hour and fifteen minutes in, the final third comes to a close. On the draw, I pick up toast with a bold, bitter espresso and some char. Through the nose, cocoa and leather dominate as vanilla falls off. The finish continues to be long with fruity earth, black pepper, and the return of black licorice. Strength and body drop down slightly in the final third to the medium-to-full mark.

EP Carrillo Maduro

The E.P. Carrillo Maduro is a delicious cigar for an exceptional price. It retails for around $5 and can be had for even cheaper if you know where to look. The flavors I found in the cigar are reminiscent of the Drew Estate Papas Fritas mixed with the Cohiba Secretos. Not often do you find a stick in this price range that offers so much complexity and depth. The burn and construction is spot-on aside from a slightly snug draw. This is the kind of cigar that would be perfect as a “daily driver,” and I highly recommend it.

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)