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Cigar Review | RoMa Craft Tobac CRAFT 2018

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out the RoMa Craft Tobac CRAFT 2018. This new cigar is limited to 2,000 boxes of 10 and is a follow up to the last CRAFT release from a few years ago. It’s a 5 x 60 figurado shaped almost like a baseball bat. Each cigar retails for $15.

RoMa Craft Tobac CRAFT 2018

There are two wrappers on this cigar – an Ecuadorian Connecticut Dark Candela and a Pennsylvanian Broadleaf. Inside, the blend features an Ecuadorian Habano Ligero binder and fillers from the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, and Pennsylvania.

The box these cigars come packaged in is noteworthy. It’s a solid cedar box with a cedar insert displaying an Ernest Hemmingway quote right on top of all the cigars. The lift-off lid is secured by a custom-made steel wrap of sorts that has the company logo stamped out of it. I’ve seen this steel band turned into some pretty “crafty” stuff (see what I did there?)

RoMa Craft Tobac CRAFT 2018

Pre-light, the cold draw tastes just like a chocolate bar. The foot produces a grassy aroma, while I smell chocolatey earth off the wrapper. Once lit, I get earthy grass from the closed candela foot, and it quickly transitions to black pepper. Through the nose, nutty toast and pepper make an appearance. The finish gives me grassy earth, chocolate, and vegetal leather.

After forty-five minutes, the first third comes to a close. On the draw, I pick up grassy earth with bombs of black pepper and leather. Through the nose, toast blends with dark cocoa and a hint of sweetness. The finish displays an explosion of black pepper alongside dark cocoa and earth. Strength and body start off very full.

RoMa Craft Tobac CRAFT 2018

An hour and twenty-five minutes in, the second third ends. I find cocoa, espresso, and earth on the draw. On the retro-hale, black pepper blows through my sinuses with some toast and grassy notes. The finish hits me with even more bombs of black pepper on top of a slightly salty char. Strength and body remain at the full mark.

RoMa Craft Tobac CRAFT 2018

The final third gets me to two hours. Spicy black pepper and earth take over the draw. Through the nose, a very potent mix of black and red pepper ignite my senses. Spicy black pepper dominates the finish with some more char and hints of leather. Strength and body finish out at the full mark.

RoMa Craft Tobac CRAFT 2018

The RoMa Craft Tobac CRAFT 2018 is an excellent cigar. It’s got a healthy amount of complexity with very rich, bold flavors. Construction is impressively perfect, and smoke output was satisfying. It’s one of the stronger cigars on the market, so if you prefer a milder smoking experience, you will not likely enjoy this. However, if you can take the heat of a bold cigar, this is an exceptional option that you’ll smoke until your fingers burn. I highly recommend this one. Buy them all up if you can find them!

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Davidoff Yamasá

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out the new Davidoff Yamasá. For this review, I smoke the 5×50 Robusto. This stick features wrapper and binder leaves from the Yamasá region of the Dominican Republic. It is said this region is very marshy making tobacco growth difficult. Inside the cigar are long fillers from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. The Yamasá comes with a hefty MSRP of $19.70.

Davidoff Yamasa

The wrapper produces a woody aroma, while I smell a sweeter wood out of the foot. On the cold draw, I don’t pick up any noticeable flavor. Once lit, smoke output is low giving me leather and earth. Through the nose, I pick up light cedar and white pepper. The finish consists of black pepper spice, cocoa, and leather.

Twenty minutes in, the first third comes to a close. On the draw, I pick up oily leather with some grass and black pepper. Through the nose, there is a subtle asparagus note with black pepper. The finish gives me rich cocoa and black licorice. Strength settles in at the medium mark, while body is at medium-to-full.

Davidoff Yamasa

The second third gets me to forty minutes. There is more leather on the draw with a lot of Dominican twang. On the retro-hale, I get a grass and black pepper mix. The finish offers up more black licorice with some black pepper. Strength and body are now both at the medium-to-full mark.

Davidoff Yamasa

One hour and ten minutes in, the final third wisps away. On the draw, there is more Dominican twang with rich tobacco notes. Through the nose, I pick up sweet toast and black pepper. The finish explodes with black pepper, overwhelming any other flavors. Strength and body finish out at the medium-to-full mark.

Davidoff Yamasa

The Davidoff Yamasá is a good cigar. It has a few good flavors, and construction is solid. However, I expected more from this cigar and was disappointed by the lack of complexity and depth. Carrying a nearly $20 price tag, it should offer much more. If I’m going to spend that much money on a cigar, you can bet I’m reaching for a different stick. This doesn’t mean it’s a bad smoke. I just think it’s over-priced. Give it a try if you’re okay with coughing up the coin, but don’t expect it to blow your mind.

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Alec Bradley Black Market Filthy Hooligan

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I celebrate Saint Patty’s day a little late with the Alec Bradley Black Market Filthy Hooligan. This 2016 release comes in one size, a 6×50 Toro, and is rolled in a very attractive barber pole using Nicaraguan Jalapa and Honduran Candela leaves. Inside, an Ecuadorian Sumatra binder secures Honduran and Panamanian long fillers. Only 2,000 boxes of 22 have been made for this year’s release.

Alec Bradley Black Market Filthy Hooligan

On the cold draw, I pick up a slight fruity grass. The wrapper produces a grass, chocolate, and tobacco aroma, while I smell grass and fruit out of the foot. Once lit, chocolate, black pepper spice, and leather come through on the draw. The retro-hale gives me a sweet cocoa. On the finish, I find mild black pepper spice and earthy grass.

Alec Bradley Black Market Filthy Hooligan

After thirty minutes, the first third comes to a close. On the draw, I pick up a simple mix of cocoa and earth. Through the nose, sweet grass and cedar make an appearance. The finish is very unique with green pepper, moss, and clove. Both strength and body settle in at the medium mark.

Alec Bradley Black Market Filthy Hooligan

One hour in, the second third ends. The draw remains simple with black pepper and earth. There is no change to the retro-hale with more sweet grass and cedar. On the finish, I pick up vegetal earth with black pepper and more clove. Strength and body continue to be at the medium mark.

Alec Bradley Black Market Filthy Hooligan

The final third dwindles down at one hour and thirty minutes. Cocoa and leather mix with smoky earth to offer a more complex draw. Through the nose, the grass is now creamy, and I get more cedar. On the finish, black pepper and clove blend with a pencil lead flavor. Strength and body finish out at the medium mark.

This 2016 Filthy Hooligan is a satisfying release with unique flavor. It isn’t super complex, but it’s a nice change of pace and an overall enjoyable smoke. I’m not a huge fan of barber pole cigars as they can often be gimmicky, but this one nails it, and I prefer it to a straight Candela wrapped cigar. I definitely recommend giving it a try and setting back a five pack before they’re all gone.

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Gurkha Ninja

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out the Gurkha Ninja in the Knife size. This 5×55 Robusto features a very oily Brazilian Maduro wrapper. Inside is a Dominican binder securing Nicaraguan long fillers. It appears to have been expertly rolled.

Gurkha Ninja

The wrapper gives off a rich coffee and leather aroma while I smell damp moss out of the foot. On the cold draw, I simply taste damp moss. Once lit, I find black pepper spice on the draw with coffee and a nutty flavor. The black pepper spice kicks up on the finish with leather. Through the nose, I get cedar with leather and black pepper spice.

After thirty minutes, the first third closes out. On the draw, I find some buttery cedar with black pepper and grass. Through the nose, I pick up a nice cocoa and bold earth. The finish is tasty with coffee, oatmeal, and more black pepper spice. The strength and body settles in at the medium-to-full mark.

Gurkha Ninja

The second third gets me to one hour. The draw offers more grass with a dark cocoa. On the retro-hale, I pick up sweet earth on top of moss and cedar. The finish is simple with salty leather and black pepper. The strength and body both drop down to the medium mark in this third.

Gurkha Ninja

The final third comes to a close at one hour and thirty minutes. The draw sees the return of buttery cedar and black pepper with more grass. Through the nose, I pick up almond alongside a cinnamon graham cracker. The finish offers more salty leather with metallic earth and toast. Strength finishes at the medium mark, while body jumps back up to medium-to-full.

Gurkha Ninja

The Gurkha Ninja is a very satisfying cigar. It retails for only $5.55, but it offers a good array of delightful flavors. It’s not super complex, but the depth it does offer makes this stick a great deal. I definitely recommend it.

I’d like to give a special thanks to the Cigar Chairman for sending this to me for review. Thank you, brother!

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Montecristo No. 1

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out a well-aged Cuban cigar. The Montecristo No. 1 is a 6.5×42 Lonsdale. This No. 1 is from 2005, which puts it at 11 years old. As with any Cuban cigar, the tobacco contained in this blend is entirely from Cuba. It appears to be well rolled with a very smooth, seamless wrapper.

Montecristo No. 1

The wrapper gives off an earthy chocolate aroma, while I smell pepper and earth out of the foot. The cold draw is very snug with just a grassy flavor. Once lit, the cigar continues to be tight. On the draw, I pick up woody leather with a salty quality to it. The retro-hale offers almost no flavor with just a slight wood. The finish gives me light leather and black pepper.

After twenty-five minutes, the first third comes to a close. Smoke production is extremely low. On the draw, I pick up some salty grass with chocolate and earth. I cannot give an assessment of the retro-hale due to the low smoke output and tight draw. The finish offers some fruity cedar, hints of caramel, and mild black pepper. Strength and body settle in at the mild-to-medium mark.

Montecristo No. 1

The second third closes out at forty-five minutes. I find more salty grass on the finish with toast and roasted almond. There is finally enough smoke to pick up some sweet coffee through the nose. The finish gives me a jump in black pepper with leather and spicy cedar. Both strength and body are up to a steady medium.

Montecristo No. 1

The final third ends at an hour and a half. On the draw, I’m treated to cinnamon, cedar, and toast. The retro-hale becomes more complex with spicy leather and black pepper. On the finish, there is more black pepper with dark coffee. Strength and body finish at the medium mark.

Montecristo No. 1

The Montecristo No. 1 is a great cigar. Age gives it refined elegance and balance. Though this cigar had a very snug draw during the initial half, the delicious flavors it offered made up for that. Construction is always a gamble with Cuban cigars, but they are made of some of the most unique, flavorful tobacco in the world. This is certainly a cigar I recommend, especially with significant age.

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Sancho Panza Eslavo

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out the first Cuban regional release for Serbia. The Sancho Panza Eslavo is a stout 7.2×50 stick with a slightly tapered head and a gorgeous, chocolate brown wrapper. Obviously, this is made of all Cuban tobacco. This limited 2014 regional release is only sold in cabinets of fifty with a retail price of around $25-28 per stick.

Sancho Panza Eslavo

The wrapper gives off a potent barnyard and leather aroma. Out of the foot, I smell a very musty raisin and leather. On the cold draw, I get a musty grass flavor. Once lit, I find black pepper spice on the draw with a creamy cinnamon and bold leather. Through the nose, there is a pleasant hazelnut and earth mixture. The finish gives me more black pepper spice and cinnamon with some dark earth.

After thirty-five minutes, the first third closes out. On the draw, I pick up some nice cinnamon flavor alongside leather and black pepper. Through the nose, there is a distinct coffee with grassy earth and floral notes. The finish is delicious with a sweet and salty caramel complimented by cedar and creamy earth. Both strength and body settle in at the medium mark.

Sancho Panza Eslavo

The second third gets me to one hour and ten minutes. The draw offers more cinnamon and leather with the addition of an oak flavor. On the retro-hale, I pick up a mix of creamy hazelnut and black pepper spice. The finish transitions to a combination of cocoa, coffee, and grass. There is no change to strength or body.

Sancho Panza Eslavo

The final third ends at one hour and forty-five minutes. On the draw, I find more leather with black pepper spice and metallic earth. Through the nose, there is coffee with creamy cocoa and red pepper. The finish is a simple mix of vegetal earth and bitter cocoa. Strength and body close out at the medium mark.

Sancho Panza Eslavo

As with almost all Cubans, the Eslavo definitely needs some aging. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a great stick, but it will be so much better after a good five-year rest. I had to put the cigar down prematurely due to it heating up and becoming bitter about an inch earlier than I would usually toss a stick. Nonetheless, the cigar has a lot of complexity and good flavor until the end. It’s simply a young Cuban cigar. I still recommend it but would wait a few years to try it again.

Keep on puffin’!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Daniel Marshall Red Label Corona

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I smoke and review the Daniel Marshall Red Label in the Corona size. This 5.5×44 stick features a 5-year aged Nicaraguan Habano wrapper securing a Nicaraguan binder and Nicaraguan fillers. This is the first of a number of reviews of the Red Label line as Daniel Marshall was generous enough to provide a few samples in different sizes.

Daniel Marshall Red Label Corona

The wrapper gives off fruity tobacco, earth, and barnyard aromas. More of the same emits from the foot. The cold draw gives me some wood and tobacco. Once lit, the cigar has some noticeable black pepper spice with woody leather on the draw. The finish offers cocoa leather, and the retro-hale gives me black pepper spice, sweet cocoa, and coffee.

After thirty minutes, the first third closes out. On the draw, I find some woody leather with cocoa and spicy espresso. The retro-gale gives me a mix of graham cracker and spicy grass. A very spicy black pepper and leather dominate the finish with a little rich earth. Strength is at the medium mark while the body of the smoke is extremely full.

Daniel Marshall Red Label Corona

Fifty-five minutes in, I finish the second third. The draw has a nice mix of earthy leather and nutty cocoa alongside some black pepper spice. Through the nose, I pick up red pepper with hay and dark coffee. The finish is long with bitter char, black pepper, and leather. There is no change in strength or body.

Daniel Marshall Red Label Corona

The final third ends at one hour and fifteen minutes. On the draw, the leather flavor becomes very nutty, and I also pick up bold cocoa and espresso. The retro-hale offers some vegetal earth with leather and black pepper. A meaty, smoky note makes an appearance on the finish mixed with black licorice and peppery grass. Strength and body finish out the same.

Daniel Marshall Red Label Corona

The Red Label Corona is one heck of a powerhouse. It doesn’t have much strength, but the body of the smoke is about as full as can be. It reminds me of the Man O’ War Puro Authentico with less strength. I really think some age would do this cigar wonders. If you’re looking for a full-bodied stick with a bold flavor profile, this is the one for you. Stay tuned to see how some of the other sizes compare.

Thank you, Daniel Marshall, for providing this cigar for review. I really appreciate it!

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)