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Cigar Review | Patina Habano

Patina cigars are made at Mombacho Cigars S.A.’s Casa Favilli factory in Nicaragua. Creator and owner of the Patina brand Mo Maali, is also the National Sales Manager for the Mombacho brand. The Patina cigars are also the first time Casa Favilli used tobaccos from outside of Nicaragua.

The med plus to full Patina Habano has an Ecuadorian habano wrapper, and Nicaraguan and Pennsylvanian binders and fillers.

The med plus to full Patina Habano has an Ecuadorian habano wrapper, and Nicaraguan and Pennsylvanian binders and fillers. Also, they come packed in 16ct boxes, commemorating the number of steps on the stairway at Casa Favilli.

“When we flew down to Nicaragua to meet with the factories we had an idea of what we were looking for, but not necessarily a specific factory in mind. After we met with Mombacho, it became clear early on that ours and Mombacho’s visions and values were very similar…We wanted more than a factory that could produce us a cigar, we wanted to be a part of a family, and that sums up the relationship between Patina and Mombacho.”

This Patina Habano is sheer perfection to the eye. First off, its incredibly smooth, seamless and oily with a med dark leathery sheen. There is also a double cap and very tiny veins adorning the wrapper.

This Patina Habano is sheer perfection to the eye. First off, its incredibly smooth, seamless and oily with a med dark leathery sheen. There is also a double cap and very tiny veins adorning the wrapper. And again, I cannot find a seam here! absolutely Stunning!!!

The Aroma coming from the wrapper smells like chocolate covered socks, but socks right after you take your shoes off. To any new readers, don’t fret, these are good aromas in cigar language, LOL! The foot gives off chocolate covered nuts, wood and musky soil. The cold draw was medium firm with tones of hay, tea and wood. A far cry from the rich potent aromas on the wrapper and foot.

This Patina Habano is sheer perfection to the eye. First off, its incredibly smooth, seamless and oily with a med dark leathery sheen. There is also a double cap and very tiny veins adorning the wrapper.

First Third: How You Doin’!!!

Well ladies and gentlemen, I’m in love…I think. I’m immediately hit with a powerful yet balanced blast of spicy black pepper, sweet red pepper and woody nuttiness. I’m experiencing old leather, raisin and baking spice thru the nose on the retrohale. What an amazing start to the Patina Habano, with a perfect draw and an admirable cloud output. The smoke is not as thick as it feels but it is raging off of the foot.

Later on in the 1st third, I notice a slight metallic mineral flavor that isn’t off putting in this case because it’s balanced by the initial flavors. Also, there is a refreshing cream flavor floating around on the palate as well as the retrohale. I couldn’t have scripted a better introduction to a cigar.

I'm immediately hit with a powerful yet balanced blast of spicy black pepper, sweet red pepper and woody nuttiness. I'm experiencing old leather, raisin and baking spice thru the nose on the retrohale. What an amazing start to the Patina Habano,

Second Third: Habano Love

Just as I thought the spice factor had warn out it’s welcome, it came charging back at my palate and nostrils in the form of a black and white pepper grenade. A creamy cedar is leading the flavor parade at this point and the woody finish lingers on my tongue quite a bit. At the half way point, I start getting blessed with a hint of a dark cherry licorice like sweetness and some subtle warm baked bread nuances. I guess it’s also fair to say that the strength has reached full because I’m getting a head buzz!

A creamy cedar is leading the flavor parade at this point and the woody finish lingers on my tongue quite a bit. At the half way point, I start getting blessed with a hint of a dark cherry licorice like sweetness and some subtle warm baked bread nuances.

Final Third: Best Blind Date Ever.

Cedar, leather and cream are the contributing factors opening up the Patina Habano finale. Also, the flavor of white pepper is noticeable but not the spiciness of it. we’re at a smooth level of bonding at this point. However, I am still getting satisfying blasts of dried fruit and citrus in the nose. Before I reached nub territory, I clipped the head again to open the cigar back up a bit. I guess drooling over your cigar from sheer bliss will inevitably cause a little tar build up, LOL! This alleviated any bitterness from ruining our night together. I Put the cigar down in the ash tray for the final time with semi sweet creamy cedar coating my palate.

Cedar, leather and cream are the contributing factors opening up the Patina Habano finale. Also, the flavor of white pepper is noticeable but not the spiciness of it.

I can’t help but to reiterate how beautfully made this cigar is. It’s quite possible that I stared at it for at least 20min, admiring it’s craftsmanship. After thinking, I realize that Casa Favilli only puts out works of art, considering the Mombacho line. I’m on the verge of diving into both brands as I’ve sampled 1 from each, including this one. But, I can honestly say that I am looking forward to the experience!

I’d like to give a special S/O to my Brothers Shad Bates from Janus Tobak and Mike aka @EmojiStogies for providing all the Patina and Mombacho cigars in my humidor. I would also like to Thank you guys for taking the time to share another cigar adventure with me.

Don’t forget to register on iROBUSTO.com for up to date info, reviews and giveaways. Be sure to leave comments and feedback on these reviews so I can share your thoughts and opinion on the cigars I review.

CHEERS & SALUTE

Cigar Review | La Hacienda by Warped Cigars

Warped Cigars was started in 2009 by Kyle Gellis. This Nicaraguan puro has a funky, interesting sour aroma to it. The wrapper is a Nicaraguan corojo. The binder and filler are both unspecified Dominican tobacco. This well-constructed cigar is available in two sizes, the gran robusto weighs in at 5.5 x 52 and the superiores is 5 ⅝ x 46.

Warped Cigars

Both cigars are well priced at around $7.00. These cigars were produced at the Casa Fernandez Factory in Nicaragua made from 100% Agricola Norteña S.A (AGANORSA) tobacco.

Warped Cigars

You can read more about AGANORSA tobacco here: AGANORSA tobacco

The smooth corojo wrapper has a slight sheen with invisible veins and imperceptible seams. The roll is semi-firm. The cold draw rewards the smoker with a medium draw and combination of graham crackers and cream. Kinda like dessert for your mouth. Upon the first draw, the flavor is both toasty and nutty. There is also another flavor that is sitting in the mix that I cannot describe. My first and continuing inclination is to describe it as pine. The cigar provides a great amount of smoke and coffee on the retrohale. Black pepper sits on the back on my throat and builds as time passes. There is also a floral note.

Warped Cigars

This cigar starts out smooth. You definitely have to be very careful not to smoke this one quickly. When it heats up as it heads into the second third, the flavor shifts to one of burnt coffee with a bitter edge. This lasts a short while and then the floral cedar flavor returns. Unfortunately, the bitter returned with a raging vengeance. For some reason, this cigar did not end as well as it started. I think that this cigar is not well balanced. The pepper is overwhelming and does much to overpower the other flavors in the cigar. In this small ring gauge, it was also difficult to keep the cigar lit without overheating and making the problem worse.

Warped Cigars

Rating

Price – 3.5/5
Flavor – 3.5/5
Complexity – 3/5
Construction – 5/5
Total – 7.5/10

Cigar Review | Paul Garmirian Gourmet Series II Robusto II

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out a vintage cigar. The Paul Garmirian Gourmet Series II was rolled in 1999 and has been aging ever since. For this review, I smoke the Robusto II size which is a 5×50 stick. The company’s website lists this stick as having a Connecticut shade wrapper with Dominican binder and filler tobaccos.

Paul Garmirian Gourmet Series II Robusto II

The wrapper gives off a slight nutty earth aroma, while the foot produces a fruity toast smell with an oily characteristic. On the cold draw, I find faint raisin and tobacco flavors. Once lit, there is a salty peanut with some toast on the draw. Through the nose, I get very smooth nuttiness and cream. The finish has a light buttery cream flavor to it.

After twenty minutes, the first third closes out. The draw gives me creamy vanilla matched up with some subtle caramel flavor and a note of sweet cedar. Through the nose, I pick up a mix of salty peanut and mild coffee. On the finish, there is a faint black pepper spice with some buttery toast and smooth almond. Strength and body are both at the mild mark.

Paul Garmirian Gourmet Series II Robusto II

Forty-five minutes in, the second third ends. On the draw, there is a moist wood with more vanilla and a sweet, creamy earth. The retro-hale offers salty cedar with hay and grass. The finish gives me a slightly spicy toast note with more almond and a mild clove flavor. The body is up to the medium mark, while the strength is a steady mild.

Paul Garmirian Gourmet Series II Robusto II

One hour and five minutes gets me to the end of the final third. The draw is delicious with creamy cedar alongside some black pepper and roasted almond. Through the nose, I find more salty cedar with the introduction of some cinnamon and toast. The finish is a real treat with sweet caramel on top of smoky grass and very creamy coffee. There is no change to the strength or body.

Paul Garmirian Gourmet Series II Robusto II

The Gourmet Series II is a superb cigar aged to perfection. If you are a fan of powerhouse smokes, steer clear of this one, but if you can appreciate a smooth, mellow cigar with subtle nuances of elegant flavor, this is one you certainly don’t want to miss. Make no mistake, this is a very mild, medium-bodied stick, but it has tons of balanced flavor, and it’s one of the smoothest cigars I’ve ever lit up. I recommend smoking it in the morning before eating anything so you get the most out of this wonderful cigar.

Smoke on!
-Noah (CutLightSmoke)

Cigar Review | Entrada Toro

The Entrada Toro is a blend of Nicaraguan criollo, viso, and corojo with a San Andreas wrapper.

Entrada Toro Cigars

Price Paid: $9.30

Paired with Starbucks Caramel Frappucino

Manufactured by Casa Fernandez a vertical integration company in Nicaragua that handles all aspects of the production from seed to final product for Casa de Entrada.

All of the following sizes are boxed pressed

  • Toro – 6 x54
  • Robusto – 5 x 52
  • Gordo – 6 x 60
  • Corona – 5.5 x 44

Wrapper: San Andres Maduro
Filler: Nicaraguan Criollo, Viso & Corojo
Weather: Rainy, 80 degrees

Entrada Cigars

The cigar has a satin finish, slightly wrinkled, well packed firm roll and features a footband with the name Cigarcia. The main band is a marriage between a stamp and a traditional cigar band.

Aroma: Tobacco
Cold Draw: Well aged tobacco, hints of sweetness with a touch of spice on the tongue
First Light: Huge plumes of smoke, mouthful of flavor, smooth wonderful smelling smoke in the air
Tastes: Well-aged maduro, tobacco, sweetness, dried fruit and spice on the back of mouth

This is a very complex medium-bodied cigar. This cigar picks up a nice mix of salt and pepper that combines with the sweet chocolate, dried fruit that I find common in maduro tobacco. The flavors fleet in and out offering several very interesting flavor combinations as follows:

  • Hot chocolate
  • Pepper cream
  • Salt & pepper
  • Dried fruit & pepper
  • Floral & pepper

The Entrada Toro is a very smooth and well-balanced cigar with no unwanted ammonia or bitterness.

LeeMack912 Rating

Price – 4/5
Flavor – 4/5
Complexity – 4/5
Construction – 4/5

Total – 8.5/10

Entrada Cigars

Cigar Review | Cohiba Maduro 5 Secretos

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this go around, I check out a not-so-traditional Cuban cigar. The Cohiba Maduro 5 Secretos is 4 1/3 inches long with a 40 ring gauge. The cigar I smoked for this review was from a box produced in 2014. The Maduro 5 claims to use Maduro wrappers aged for five years. There is a barnyard aroma off the dark wrapper with some musty wood out of the foot.

Cohiba Maduro 5 Secretos

Pre-light, the draw gives me a sweet berry and some earth. I torch the cigar up, and my palate is blasted with a buttery, creamy chocolate. There is a slight spice lingering on my tongue. Through the nose, I pick up some smooth cedar.

After fifteen minutes, I finish the first third. The draw gives me a delicious buttery cocoa with some cedar and black pepper. Through the nose, there is more cedar with a roasted coffee bean, and some strong espresso. Strength and body are both settling in at the medium mark.

Cohiba Maduro 5 Secretos

The second third puts me at half an hour. On the draw, there is a bold, strong espresso with an increase in black pepper spice. The retro-hale continues to give me cedar with a sweet, dry raisin and some coffee. The finish is long and producing rich flavors of charred earth, sweet cedar, and espresso. Strength and body are now up to the medium-to-full mark.

Cohiba Maduro 5 Secretos

The final third ends at fifty-five minutes. I pick up a buttery cream on the finish mixed perfectly with espresso and black pepper. Through my nose, there is even more cedar with a creamy hay and dark chocolate. The finish gives me a berry note with smoky coffee and a slightly bitter spice. Strength and body finish at the medium-to-full mark.

Cohiba Maduro 5 Secretos

Overall, this short smoke has a wonderful mix of bold, complex flavors. To me, the perfect Maduro-wrapped cigar offers a contrast of buttery creaminess and “dark” flavors. The Maduro 5 nails that blend right on the head. It’s a nice change of pace for a Cuban cigar, and I think it has immense aging potential. I highly recommend this one.

Keep on smokin’!

-Noah (CutLightSmoke)


Cuban Cigars are expensive in the United Kingdom. If you’re ever in Düsseldorf you could get a bunch of great cigars inexpensively, so much so that even with airfare you could come out cheaper.

Cigar Review | Bolívar Libertador

It’s Stog o’Clock, and this time, I check out a popular Cuban cigar. The Bolívar Libertador is a 6.4×54 stick rolled in 2013 as an exclusive for La Casa del Habano. This blend was originally released as a French regional cigar in 2006, and it was so popular they came out with this release. The wrapper gives off a citrus and leather smell. Out of the foot, there is a raisin aroma with some more tobacco.

Bolivar Libertador

On the cold draw, I pick up light wood with some tobacco. Once lit, the cigar treats me to some grassy cedar. The retro-hale gives me more cedar, and the finish is spicy.

After forty minutes, the first third comes to a close. The draw gives me creamy toast with green earth and a mix of caramel and chocolate. On the retro-hale, I pick up an acidic coffee with creamy cedar. The finish is long with spicy leather, hazelnut, and honey. Strength is in the mild-to-medium range, and the body is at the medium mark.

Bolivar Libertador

The second third finishes at one hour and twenty-five minutes. A creamy, spicy cedar is present on the draw with notes of coffee and pretzel. Through the nose, I get a floral earth and some salty caramel. On the finish, there is some roasted almond alongside leather and honey graham cracker. Strength and body are both at the medium mark.

Bolivar Libertador

The final third closes out at two hours and twenty minutes. There is an increase in spicy cedar on the draw with roasted coffee and leather. On the retro-hale, I pick up a hay note with tree bark and some creamy caramel. The finish continues to be long with a pleasant toast note, creamy honey, and a very smooth pretzel. Strength and body end at the medium mark.

This cigar was actually so good and remained cool enough that I did not put it down after my recap of the final third. I continued smoking it all the way down to the nub and closed out my smoking time at a little under three hours with the cigar on the end of a skewer.

Bolivar Libertador

Overall, the Libertador is one for the record books. It quickly climbed into my list of favorites and is something I highly recommend to every seasoned cigar smoker. They aren’t cheap, falling in the $17-$25 range, but they are one of those smokes that’s worth every penny. Age has treated the blend well, and it will continue to improve as the years go by. Not often do you find a cigar with such complexity and balance. I can’t explain how creamy and thick the smoke was throughout, and construction was spot on minus a wonky burn here and there. This cigar is a classic example of what Cuban cigars should be, and I absolutely loved it.

Get yo’ smoke on!

-Noah (CutLightSmoke)


Cuban Cigars are expensive in the United Kingdom. If you’re ever in Düsseldorf you could get a bunch of great cigars inexpensively, so much so that even with airfare you could come out cheaper.

Cigar Review | Padron Family Reserve 50 Years Maduro

It’s Stog o’Clock! This go around, we have a special stick to review. The Padron Family Reserve 50 Years Maduro is a 5×54 box-pressed cigar featuring a Maduro wrapper from Nicaragua with a Nicaraguan binder and Nicaraguan fillers – just how I like it! I have high expectations for this highly rated, expensive Padron. If this thing is half as delicious as it looks, I’m in for a real treat!

Padron 50 Years

There is a chocolate and tobacco aroma coming off the wrapper, and the foot produces a grassy, sweet tobacco smell. After I torch this gorgeous stick, I pick up a nice creamy chocolate with a hint of spice and coffee. The finish is long with more coffee. The retro-hale produces spice, tobacco, and sweet earth.

Padron 50 Years

After thirty-five minutes, I finish the first third. The draw gives me a sweet chocolate with a refined coffee, smoked almond, and a fried banana flavor. That’s right – fried banana. Aged tobacco comes through the nose with sweet cedar, black pepper, and pastry dough. On the long finish, a slight spice with dark cocoa, buttery leather, and blackberries steal the show.

Padron 50 Years

One hour and five minutes gets me past the second third. On the draw, I pick up a spicy chocolate with more coffee and an herbal tea. The retro-hale gives me leathery cocoa, salty pencil lead, and spicy black cherry notes. Aged tobacco on the finish is mixed with berries, espresso, and a buttery cream. The body and strength are both medium-to-full with perfect construction.

Padron 50 Years

The final third puts me at one hour and forty minutes. On the draw, I get a sweet cinnamon with coffee and an increase in caramel and earth. Through the nose, I get grassy leather with notes of cocoa, smoky cedar, and almond. The finish is still long with black pepper, buttery cream, and a silky milk chocolate. Body is at the medium-to-full mark with strength now at a solid full.

Padron 50 Years

Overall, the Padron Family Reserve 50 Years Maduro is another solid win. It’s a very complex. balanced cigar. The steep price tag of between $25 and $30 is worth every penny, and I highly recommend trying it. The 1926 Serie 80 Years Maduro is still my favorite Padron, but the 50 Years follows closely behind. This cigar is the perfect size for committing to exquisite relaxation without an all-day commitment. It’s another delicious Padron that joins the ranks of my favorite cigars.

Happy smoking!

-Noah (CutLightSmoke)


The Padron is a very enjoyable cigar. We consider it a classic. You can now Purchase Padron Cigars online from Famous Smoke Shop and try them for yourself.

If you’re looking for a great deal on the cigar featured in this review, you can get the Padron Family Reserve 50 Years Maduro from Famous Smoke Shop as well as many other premium cigars.